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Frog or toad
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Frog or toad

another pic of the frog or toad. Found in my 2 foot high raised rockery bed today. This is the dryest part of the garden so goodness knows what it is doing there. It has been startling me for about a week but I could never see what it was. It's about 2 inches from nose to tail and a yellow colour and the skin looked very dry and smooth. Anyone know what it is?
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Picture added on 20 July 2009
Comments:
That will be a common frog, they can vary in colour from light yellow to dark olivey brown.
Added by Elsie Cooper on 25 July 2009
I thought it might be but cannot understand how it got into the garden or why as there's no water anywhere and in 26 years here have never seen a frog in the garden. The raised rockery is bone dry all year round as it's all stone underneath with about 6 inches of soil on top and very free draining. Not exactly the habitat a frog would seek out?
Added by Marion Mcleod on 27 July 2009
Hi. Apparently frogs don't need water except to lay eggs. They eat anything that will fit in their mouths.
Added by Linda Drever on 02 August 2009
We have seen half a dozen in our garden Marion, it's the first time we have seen frogs, it must be a good year for them.
Added by Spoot on 03 August 2009
Do they eat those huge snails??? I have thousands of them all around the garden.
Added by Marion Mcleod on 03 August 2009
There are dozens in my garden.they make a terrible racket in mid March when they mate in the pond. I haven't seen a slug for years though, and frogs don't eat my veg.
Added by Willie Watters on 04 August 2009
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